Success Principles in an Ever Changing World

 

We are living in an exciting time, with technologies that launch immediate changes and communication on a global scale. However, with these CDR_20160314_1118_portrait with john Originalcomes the complementary concepts of the intensity of competition and challenges that are often constant, complex and causing results that can be unpredictable. The dichotomy of existence then borders on whether we can retain the same standards of success in business or must we transition into a new paradigm. We must alter our attitudes from simply looking at a product or solution as an offering and instead, appeal to a passion and a purpose for people to follow the dream.

The beauty in the simplicity of some of the basic core values is also extended to the fact that they have stood the test of time. Success principles are less about business and more closely aligned with human nature and behavior. There is more to being connected than just the circuitry, we have entered a time that requires an elevation to a different level of attraction. Technologies may be added and our ability to adopt and adapt may be challenged, but the ultimate concept is that we are still dealing with people, and maintaining those levels toward and how we deal with humanity is the key to success.

Business ethics: two words that encompass an entire relationship of attitude with self, co-workers, partners and clients. It is a concept of existence, the methodology that follows true to every response and reaction. It is truth as well as accountability, ego and honesty.  Everything that is said, done and accomplished in writing as well as behind closed doors, is surrounded by the criteria that is set forth in a company’s ethical standards.

Remaining open-minded is a success principle that stands on its own and yet is an important factor that must be exemplified in a top down attitude. Fresh ideas, new ways of viewing and thinking, keeps everyone from becoming stagnant and encourages the attitudes that will keep a business competitive. Additionally, it requires that we sometimes remain on the edge of that which no one else would consider, the fringe of potential and possibly even a touch of crazy.

Quality and trust remain the mainstay as a company baseline. We have all heard of businesses that have been lost in scandal or fell prey to offering a ‘vapor’ product. Those that have retained the quality of their offerings combined with the trust of all participants, will have the ability to focus on the variations and complexities of change. Trust is the key word that is the center of existence. Once you are trusted, people will offer you their honor and respect.

Keeping up on everything new: This translates into the individual business vertical and also in business practices. New technologies bring about new ways of doing things as well as alternate visions. Being successful includes the ability to embrace the change that is upon them and adapt as an overall strategy. The concept goes beyond just what is pertinent or what might be useful, but expands to every aspect of ‘newness’. It explores areas that were never thought of before and takes the mind into territories of the undiscovered.

Thinking as if the box doesn’t exist: This takes the tradition of ‘outside of the box’ to an entire new level. A box expresses boundaries that can retain and reduce.  A successful business philosophy can introduce ideas, face challenges and competition with the understanding that those barriers simply don’t exist. Many of the most successful companies such as Apple discarded the ‘box’ concept to open the doors to allow the imagination to roam.

A key success principle must also incorporate an environment of positive, imaginative and creative people. This is an imperative to jump-start any new project, accept change in direction and maintain the core concept of business ethics. Constructive instead of destructive is a concentric attitude of being that can lead a company down the path of success while acknowledging change and direction.

Each of the principles can be outright as well as subtle, but to achieve the best that all can be, they should be understood and accepted as part of the business whole. Success in today’s business technology driven market envelops new aspects and directions that extends beyond and opens doors to the next generations.

Contributed by Rakesh Malhotra, Founder of Five Global Values (www.fiveglobalvalues.com) and Author of “Adventures of Tornado Kid, Whirling Back Home Towards Timeless Values”.  Passionately determined to uncover the mystery of human behavior. His fascination with the influence of core values on human behavior stems from a career which has seen rise from an entry-level sales job to that of a seasoned CEO. Having worked, lived, or traveled to more than 40 countries, he has been able to study performance and human behavior across all cultures. Follow me @FiveValues -

“If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.” – Mother Teresa

 

A nation's culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.

A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.

Peace signs and peace demonstrations. Peace in the heart, peace in the home. Peace of mind and peace of spirit. Peace, a state of harmony and calm that is characterized by a lack of violence, can be found in many shapes and forms.  The English word was derived more than 700 years ago from the Hebrew word “shalom,” which means safety, prosperity and friendship. Since that time, the word “peace” has been used to connote lack of war, goodwill among others and a calm internal state, among others.

Peace is a universal value, which, like love, compassion, integrity, respect and responsibility, can be found on every continent, every country, every state, city, town and neighborhood. Peace is diverse and knows no nationality, geography, culture or race. As a general rule, the more widespread peace is, the more unity, happiness and accord will exist among tribes, cultures, governments, families and friends.

Inner peace is a particularly prized state, since someone who experiences inner peace is better prepared to deal with personal and global challenges and discord, can enjoy true happiness regardless of what is going on around him or her, and experiences a genuine state of calm, joy and understanding.

In addition, there are a variety of peace prizes awarded to leaders in the peace community. The most remarkable of these are the Nobel Peace Prize, given annually by the Nobel committee to a person or persons who actively work for peace, and the International Gandhi Peace Prize, which was named after Mahatma Gandhi, the former leader of India, and is awarded to people and institutions that contribute to political, social and economic peace through their non-violent methods. Notably, these distinguished awards can be earned by anyone, regardless of race, creed, sex, age or nationality.

Likewise, the United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan conflict management group created by Congress “to prevent and mitigate international conflict without resorting to violence.” The center works to save lives and increase the government’s ability to manage conflicts. Peace is a powerful concept that pervades government institutions all the way down to individual lives.

In addition, the idea of peace has spread to schools (Peace College in Raleigh, North Carolina), institutions (the Peace Corps), drinks (Peace Coffee), songs (“Imagine” by John Lennon) and more. There are even Twitter and Facebook groups dedicated exclusively to peace. While peace protestors wearing tie-dye t-shirts and waving peace signs were more prominent in the 1960s, symbols of peace continue to proliferate today, in homage to the idea that peace is important, no matter what the year, location or world circumstances.

Parents, caregivers, leaders and individuals who are seeking to create more peace can start with the concept of inner peace.

Ask yourself: How can I create more peace in my life? Where can I be more peaceful and less angry? How can I show others that I am committed to peace? What do I need to let go of or invite into my life? Examining your own life history is a great place to start identifying and spreading peace.

Then, you can share written and verbal stories and songs with children that espouse peace over violence, discuss current world events (both peaceful and violent ones) and their impact on others, and remind your children and family members of the value of peace in the world. When you see acts of  anger or violence, be willing to point them out and discuss them. Likewise, when you see acts of peace, be willing to celebrate them.

Further, you can get involved in peaceful activities in your community, whether it is a march for peace or a peaceful cause, a meditation group focused on cultivating inner peace or a nonprofit organization that helps victims of violence get back on their feet. There are a variety of small and large actions you can take to make your household, neighborhood, community and world at large a more peaceful place.

Unfortunately, acts of violence among children – shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado and Virginia Tech University, among others, as well as the fact that more than 13 million school kids will be bullied this year – sometimes seem to be more prominent than acts of peace. While these horrific incidents serve to spread an environment of mistrust, hatred and confusion, peace, love, compassion, integrity, respect and responsibility can counteract the weight of anger in the world. Applying a peaceful attitude and peaceful actions when dealing with children can help to foster more love and less hate in the world.

At first blush, peace might seem like more of an abstract concept than a tangible goal, but true peace, the kind that starts within, can spread like wildfire, changing ideas, lives and communities in the process.

Peaceful thoughts lead to peaceful words, which lead to peaceful actions. When you find peace in your mind, it’s easier to speak and communicate with peaceful intentions, leading to more peaceful interactions in your life.

Contributed by  Rakesh Malhotra, Founder of Five Global Values (www.fiveglobalvalues.com) and Author of “Adventures of Tornado Kid, Whirling Back Home towards Timeless Values”.  Passionately determined to uncover the mystery of human behavior, his fascination with the influence of core values on human behavior stems from a career which has seen rise from an entry-level sales job to that of a seasoned CEO. Having worked, lived, or traveled to more than 40 countries, he has been able to study performance and human behavior across all cultures.

 

 

 

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How to get along in this world, how to be happy, peaceful, and successful?

Core values play a key role in the success

Parents, Teachers and students should consider the strength of basic human values.

No matter where you stand on educational reform or character education, there’s no denying the fact that we are currently experiencing a worldwide epidemic of youth violence. Whether propelled by depression, fear of failure, the pain of being bullied, or hosts of other troubles young people face today, more and more of them are turning to violence as a way of dealing with the stress of growing up.

So, what is it that these kids are desperate for? What do they need that they are not getting at home or at school? The answer is simple—basic human values instruction. These children are desperately seeking someone who can teach them how to get along in this world, how to be happy, peaceful, and successful. They are fed a stream of pocket-lining sales pitches from the media to look a certain way and wear a certain label of clothing. When the bell rings for each school day to begin, they face the scrutiny of their peers, all of whom are also trying to find their way in a world of mixed messages and misplaced values. Perhaps at some point, it all becomes too much.

Often, teachers shy away from imposing their personal values on their students. I suppose some parents think this is a good thing. Maybe I even agree to some extent. After all, would I want a teacher whose values differ from my own teaching those beliefs to my child? Perhaps not. But, what do we do about those kids who aren’t taught worthwhile values by their families or those who don’t have families to teach them anything at all? What do we do when those kids show up at our doors begging to be taught? Do we turn them away? If we do, what will happen to those kids down the road? How will they deal with the stressors that we all face as our lives become increasingly complex and demanding? Will they turn to alcohol or drugs to control their fear and anxiety? Will they fill our streets and prisons with their misguided self-soothing? Will they do something unthinkable? Will it be their fault if they do?

These are all questions we must answer if we’re serious about leaving no child behind in our society, as we say we are. Clearly, becoming a successful, productive, and fulfilled human being is about more than learning how to read and solve math problems. It’s certainly about more than passing a standardized test, yet we continue to place so much importance on what are arguably trivial things, and in the meantime, kids continue to suffer—from the pain of being abandoned, from the fear and confusion of feeling lost, from the ignorance of not knowing any better.

The school system is the ideal place for these seemingly lost children to receive the moral guidance they are craving. Teachers spend a good seven hours a day with these kids and no doubt impose a powerful influence on their lives, for better or for worse. Failing to take at least a small portion of each day to address issues such as social skills, coping mechanisms, life strategies, and character issues is a mistake that frankly, we can’t afford to make.

Parents, Teachers and students should consider the strength of the following five core values, which are universally valued:

  • Responsibility: There is nothing more      fundamental to being an adult in our society than accountability. Parents can      create cause-and-effect circumstances, such as letting a teen borrow the      car provided they put gas in it. Breaking such a pact though, for      instance, because of a bad grade in school, can mix the message. Parents      must be consistent if they want their children to learn responsibility.   
  • Compassion: It’s not just a term for being      nice; compassion is a form of intelligence – an empathetic ability to put      oneself in another’s shoes. This type of abstract thinking is linked to      strong team leaders.  When given the      opportunity to communicate with one another and share their feelings,      students will learn to empathize and feel compassion for their fellow man.
  • Integrity: Integrity is the glue that      holds together all of the values. When given an option to stray from our      values, such as lying for the sake of convenience, integrity is there to      hold us accountable. Teachers should stress the importance of integrity      to one’s self-esteem. When students learn to make decisions based on      honesty and integrity, they can then feel proud of their choices and      empowered to continue making a positive difference in our world.
  • Peace: Inner peace provides the      necessary calm-in-the-storm mindset that allows for clear thinking when      it’s most needed. In the business world, peace is clarity. Teachers      need to model and teach conflict resolution so that students learn to      peacefully interact with one another even when a problem or dispute      arises.
  • Love: Perhaps the only flaw with      this word is that it is so loaded with meaning. People use the term to      denote fraternal fondness, romance, simple enjoyment of things and even      the meaning of life. Without love in life, including love for what one      does on the job, and love for others, an individual’s sense of purpose      melts away. Students should be taught to love and      respect themselves. Only by loving themselves can students ever learn to      truly love others. Love, being the opposite of fear, is the one force that      truly has the potential to change our world for the better.

Rakesh Malhotra, author of “Adventures of Tornado Kid, Whirling Back Home Towards Timeless Values” (www.FiveGlobalValues.com).

 

 

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The Purpose of Life is to Help Others

If you want to be happy, practice compassion

“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” - Dalai Lama

 

Derived from the Latin, compassion technically means “to suffer with,” but compassion goes far beyond suffering. Combining empathy, sympathy, care and concern, compassion involves feeling for another person and a willingness to express or share that virtue. Compassion involves looking beyond one’s own life and plight and seeing into another’s eyes, circumstances and soul. In other words, compassion is caring put into action.

Compassion in action can be as simple as standing up to let someone else have your seat on the bus or allowing another car into your lane in traffic. It can be donating holiday gifts to a local family in need, writing a hand-written letter or card to let someone know that you’re thinking of them, or talking to a friend about a struggle that he or she is having. Compassion can be a word, a hand, a look, a thought or a notion.

Compassion knows no gender, no age, no nationality, no culture, no race and no religion. It is a universal value. Likewise, compassion is integral to the global values of love, peace, integrity, respect and responsibility, all human values that provide evidence of caring, of noticing, of a willingness to reach out and make a difference, regardless of any perceived differences.

Further, compassion offers both short- and long-term benefits; scientific studies have shown that compassionate people produce more of a hormone that can slow down the aging process and less of a stress hormone that can speed the process up. Likewise, compassion can engender more appreciation, happiness and better relationships. If you are a parent or caregiver, a leader in your community or simply a concerned citizen or friend, you can make yourself a paragon of compassion.

Following are five helpful ideas for sharing and showing compassion in your community:

1)    Make compassion a part of every single day. When you wake up each morning, simply hold the word or the idea of compassion in your mind for a few minutes, determining how you can offer a little more compassion during that particular day.

2)    Focus on what you have in common with others, rather than your differences. Teach your children to do the same through discussion and modeling. Most suffering occurs when we believe that we’re separate, rather than connected. Recognize that others are going through the same things you are – maybe not at the same time or in the same way, but everyone wants to feel safe, happy, secure and loved.

3)    Practice random acts of kindness. Pay for a stranger’s coffee, leave a thoughtful, anonymous note for someone who could use a boost, smile more, say “thank you” a lot. Small acts of kindness and compassion can add up to a pretty big deal.

4)    Practice loving-kindness meditation. Set aside five minutes to find a comfortable, quiet space, close your eyes and sit up tall. Repeat the following phrases silently to yourself: May I be safe. May I be healthy. May I be happy. May I live with ease. (You can substitute other statements that resonate more with you, if you prefer.) After three to five rounds, move on to someone you care about, envision that person in your mind’s eye, and repeat the same statements silently to them: May you be safe. May you be healthy. May you be happy. May you live with ease. Then, do the same thing, without judgment, for someone who you struggle with. Lastly, send these thoughts of loving-kindness out on a global level. Notice a warm glow from within as you finish and sit silently for a few moments.

5)    While compassion in action is particularly powerful, don’t be afraid to talk about it and define it with your kids. Let them know that compassion is important.

In a recent study at Harvard Business School, social researcher Michael Norton gave undergraduates money to spend on themselves or on others. Interestingly, the ones who spent money on others – who gave money away – were happier than those who kept the money for themselves. Likewise, those who reported giving money to charity were happier than those who didn’t. The website DonorChoose.org helps people benefit others, and, in turn, themselves. Money can buy happiness – when you spend it on someone else. Indeed, compassion in action can have incredibly powerful internal and external applications and effects. Give, care, contribute – you’ll make your world better and contribute to more global happiness.

 

 

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The Missing Link: Family Values Can Make the Difference

No matter where you stand on educational reform or character education, there’s no denying the fact that we are currently experiencing a worldwide epidemic of youth violence. Whether propelled by depression, fear of failure, the pain of being bullied, or a host of other troubles young people face today, more and more of them are turning to violence as a way of dealing with the stress of growing up. From the Virginia Tech massacre of 2007 to recent riots in Britain and racial attacks in Australia, it’s easy to see that the problem of youth violence knows no geographical, socio-economical, or ethnic boundaries. It’s a problem we all face together, and if we’re going to solve it, it’s going to take a united effort. So, the question becomes—where do we begin?

If you walk into a public school today, you’ll no doubt see kids who are different. Not different in the sense that they wear different clothes or hang out in odd circles, not the traditional kind of different that normally comes to mind when you think back to high school.

No—these kids are different under the surface. Perhaps they keep to themselves or shy away from making eye contact with others, or maybe they deal with their pain by embracing the other extreme—wearing a fake smile, being the class clown, reaching out to teachers. Whatever their coping mechanisms, if you look closely, you’ll see something similar in all of these kids,  something that screams desperation, even if that scream is sometimes muffled by the roles they play for their teachers and peers.

So, what is it that these kids are desperate for? What do they need that they are not getting at home or at school? The answer is simple—basic human values instruction. These children are desperately seeking someone who can teach them how to get along in this world, how to be happy, peaceful, and successful. They are fed a stream of pocket-lining sales pitches from the media to look a certain way and wear a certain label of clothing. When the bell rings for each school day to begin, they face the scrutiny of their peers, all of whom are also trying to find their way in a world of mixed messages and misplaced values. Perhaps at some point, it all becomes too much.

Often, teachers shy away from imposing their personal values on their students. I suppose some parents think this is a good thing. Maybe I even agree to some extent. After all, would I want a teacher whose values differ from my own teaching those beliefs to my child? Perhaps not. But, what do we do about those kids who aren’t taught worthwhile values by their families or those who don’t have families to teach them anything at all? What do we do when those kids show up at our doors begging to be taught? Do we turn them away? If we do, what will happen to those kids down the road? How will they deal with the stressors that we all face as our lives become increasingly complex and demanding? Will they turn to alcohol or drugs to control their fear and anxiety? Will they fill our streets and prisons with their misguided self-soothing? Will they do something unthinkable? Will it be their fault if they do?

These are all questions we must answer if we’re serious about leaving no child behind in our society, as we say we are. Clearly, becoming a successful, productive, and fulfilled human being is about more than learning how to read and solve math problems. It’s certainly about more than passing a standardized test, yet we continue to place so much importance on what are arguably trivial things, and in the meantime, kids continue to suffer—from the pain of being abandoned, from the fear and confusion of feeling lost, from the ignorance of not knowing any better. As David Light Shields (2011) says in his article Character as the Aim of Education, “we have too often equated excellence of education with the quantity of the content learned, rather than with the quality of character the person develops” (p. 49).

The school system is the ideal place for these seemingly lost children to receive the moral guidance they are craving. Teachers spend a good seven hours a day with these kids and no doubt impose a powerful influence on their lives, for better or for worse. Failing to take at least a small portion of each day to address issues such as social skills, coping mechanisms, life strategies, and character issues is a mistake that frankly, we can’t afford to make. In fact, there are four key values all public school teachers should impress upon their students on a regular basis:

  • Love- Students should be taught to love and respect themselves. Only by loving themselves can students ever learn to truly love others. Love, being the opposite of fear, is the one force that truly has the potential to change our world for the better.
  • Peace-Teachers need to model and teach conflict resolution so that students learn to peacefully interact with one another even when a problem or dispute arises.
  • Compassion-When given the opportunity to communicate with one another and share their feelings, students will learn to empathize and feel compassion for their fellow man.
  • Integrity- Teachers should stress the importance of integrity to one’s self-esteem. When students learn to make decisions based on honesty and integrity, they can then feel proud of their choices and empowered to continue making a positive difference in our world.

That is not to say that current curricula and content objectives should be thrown out the window. On the contrary, they should be kept intact and even enhanced. When character education is taught alongside traditional standards and objectives, they complement each other rather nicely just as they do in real life. For instance, when a lesson in English class turns into a debate as to whether or not the main character was justified in his vengeful actions, and students are encouraged to think of other more productive ways the problem could be resolved, they are not just learning about literature or developing critical thinking skills (useful things in their own right), but they’re also internalizing important moral lessons that can serve them for a lifetime. Stiff-Williams (2010) argues this idea eloquently, stating that “rather than adding a new course to an already overloaded school curriculum, character education should be integrated with other subject areas and routinely taught through all classes and by all teachers” (p. 115).

Ideally, values instruction should not be taught in the classroom alone. When students have these ideas reinforced at home, they become even more engrained. As British Prime Minister David Cameron stated in reaction to recent riots, “if we want to have any hope of mending our broken society, family and parenting is where we’ve got to start.” Unfortunately, there’s no way to guarantee that all parents will do their part to help their children develop basic human values. There is something we can do to encourage them, however. By inviting parents, grandparents, and other family members to take part in values-based education through in-class activities as well as enrichment exercises that can be completed at home, teachers can have a positive and transformative impact on the home environment.

What would be the fruits of such a targeted and concerted effort? Would our children get along better with one another both inside and outside of school? Would they, over time, develop their own moral compass and as a result, become confident and empowered young adults? Would they then take on leadership roles in their communities and influence others to do the same? Would we save just one kid from being the victim or perpetrator of an act of violence? Would our world change, if merely a little at a time? It’s certainly possible, and if there’s even a small chance—an inkling of a possibility— that we could really make a difference, one that goes beyond teaching a kid long division, shouldn’t we at least try?


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